In your experience what is the most efective technology to predict and prevent machine failure

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Continuing our dialogue regarding Augury versus an in-house vibration analysis program let's put some numbers together.

@Andrew Pry @Scott Chaney @Terry LeDoux @Adam Kilgore @518 @Scott Reed

In your experience what is the most efective technology to predict and prevent machine failure 12 votes

Traditional Vibration Analysis
0%
AI-driven solutions "Augury"
8%
Scott Reed 1 vote
A combination of both
66%
Terry LeDouxRoy SmithsonAdam KilgoreGuillem BasAlexander OcampoJorge MurilloRangsan T.Jeff_meyers 8 votes
Other
25%
Clifton GreenAndrew PryRalph Mitchell 3 votes

Comments

  • Scott Reed
    Options
    AI-driven solutions "Augury"

    @Jorge Murillo Great poll question, but difficult to answer. I chose AI as it removes the human element (procedure, technique, errors and availability) from the equation as well as being continuous in data flow. Obviously, it takes people too to respond with their senses and knowledge to investigate and mitigate. In areas that don't fit, low/slow speed, it requires the inclusion of other technologies and practices in order to eliminate machine failure. Oil analysis and lubrication programs along with ultrasonic are awesome compliments to any vibration monitoring discipline.

  • Jorge Murillo
    Options
    A combination of both

    @Scott Reed Thank you for sharing your thoughts. The capability to gather real-time data and maintain a continuous stream of information makes AI a powerful tool for enriching the analyst's insights. As highlighted by @Brandon Blatter in his article titled "How AI-Driven Vibration Analysis Enables Higher-Value Maintenance Work," it's essential that human analysts retain the ultimate decision-making authority on when and why to initiate machine shutdowns.

    @Shay Shitrit

    https://www.augury.com/blog/production-health/how-ai-driven-vibration-analysis-enables-higher-value-maintenance-work/

  • Clifton Green
    Options
    Other

    @Jorge Murillo Not sure I've met you before, so consider this an internet handshake.

    I've been on a couple different sides of this, a decade+ in the past I was in the field doing data collection/analysis/field balancing/alignments, have been in management, and now at Augury. My opinion, the correct answer is "other" for a few reasons.

    1 - "…technology to predict and prevent machine failure" is distinctly different from just "vibration analysis". Your poll options single out the term "traditional vibration analysis", but there are a range of solutions to discuss here. Augury, in our current form, is only a piece of the predictive maintenance puzzle. Vibration analysis is a single tool in a larger toolbox that should include thermography, tribology, ultrasound detection, power quality analysis, motor current signatures, etc. While we can combine some of those data streams through our Halo/r4000/Auguscope solutions, others we cannot (at least as of today 😬).

    2 - I think the spirit of your question was in the vein of "what is the most effective vibration analysis setup", and my answer to that is absolutely a combination of in-house reliability engineers + a hybrid detection model like Augury. The problem here often comes down to budget, training, and talent retention though, which is something manufacturing management will always have to battle. In-house equipment isn't free, upkeep isn't negligible, and as a former 3rd party calibration provider for some of the larger data analyzer & UT thickness gauges on the market, that cost is often completely forgotten about (not to mention the time you don't have your equipment because it is shipped out for calibration).

    3 - There are some unique considerations depending on what industry we are talking about and the nature of monitored equipment. That is a much deeper discussion, but depending on cost, availability, and the safety implications of equipment failure, the only viable option is immediate shutdown upon minor baseline deviations as shown by a true online/constant monitoring system.

    V/R,

    Clifton Green

  • Jorge Murillo
    Options
    A combination of both

    @GREEN MACHINE Nice to meet you as well! Thank you for your thoughtful input. You've raised a crucial question about the term "predictive" in relation to current technologies. It's true that while sensors may detect potential issues, can they truly predict something before it's detected? The essence of the poll question revolves around using vibration analysis as a tool to foresee and prevent failures.

    I absolutely concur that a comprehensive predictive maintenance approach involves a combination of various tools that work synergistically to enhance uptime. Yet, I would like to point out that more isn't always better in this context. Thoughtful task selection based on functions and failure modes is key to efficiency and cost-effectiveness.

    As for the Auguscope, I find the concept intriguing. The ability to connect your phone to the system and to have real-time, precise feedback sounds fascinating. I grew up using Emerson's technology from the CSI 1910 to the CSI 2030, equipped with impressive capabilities such as field balancing, laser alignment, motor current, transient analysis, and the remarkable PeakVue. It's incredible how far we've come since then. Your discussion about Auguscope has piqued my interest, and I look forward to learning more about it.

  • Other

    Ultrasound, for first detection of bearing failures, followed up with vibration analysis. These both go together very well.

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